The People for Fairness Coalition made its presence known in the media in December of 2013 when, in collaboration with the National Coalition for the Homeless, PFC launched it’s annual Vigils to honor individuals who died on the streets. Since 2013, where the Vigil received a prominent place on the Washington Post’s first page, there has been ample coverage of the annual Vigils (2013, 2014, and 2015) in a wide variety of print, radio, electronic, and video media. Launched in late 2014, the PFC Downtown Washington DC Public Restroom Initiative has been achieving increasing media attention. Articles have also appeared in the media focusing on PFC’s advocacy at the DC City Hall to end homelessness in Washington, DC; PFC’s objections to the DC Government’s decision to dismantle encampments of the homeless, as well as PFC’s celebration of it’s 7th anniversary.

Articles focusing on PFC have appeared in: the Washington Post, Street Sense, Street Roots, WAMU 88.5, the George Washington University Hatchett, the Examiner, the DC Currents, and a variety of electronic media.

2016

November 30, 2016
Street Sense
A fresh draft of winter air filled the basement of Western Presbyterian Church on Nov. 22 as a newcomer entered to attend breakfast at Miriam’s Kitchen. At one of the tables, the weekly People for Fairness Coalition (PFFC) meeting had gathered to decide on particulars of the coalition’s upcoming Homeless Person’s Memorial Day demonstrations.
November 20, 2016
Street Sense
On October 28 the Focus Attitude and Commitment to Excellence (FACE) group of Street Sense vendors, along with the People for Fairness Coalition (PFFC), convened to form a panel and deliberate, with an audience of housed and unhoused individuals, on issues of housing, poverty and homelessness.
November 16, 2016
Street Sense
The Focus Attitude and Commitment to Excellence (FACE) group of Street Sense vendors, along with the People for Fairness Coalition (PFFC), convened to form a panel and deliberate, with an audience of housed and unhoused individuals, on issues of housing, poverty and homelessness.
January 24, 2016
streetsense
The People for Fairness Coalition (PFFC) is a group of housed and unhoused community members that meets every Tuesday morning at Miriam’s Kitchen. Anyone may become a member by attending three consecutive meetings.

2015

December 22, 2015
The Washington Post
The dearth of public restrooms in downtown Washington could affect anyone who happens to be in the area. But the group that’s working to remedy the situation, the People for Fairness Coalition, is most concerned about the lack of facilities for the homeless.
December 18, 2015
The Washington Post
His name was Sheikh Zayed Sultan Aal-Nahyan, but to his friends he was just Zeke, sometimes just Z.
He went to East Potomac Park sometimes as a child growing up in the District, and as an adult, he liked the scenery there just as much. He had a daughter in Georgia he hoped to reconnect with.
December 18, 2015
Street Sense
Each name called out was that of a homeless D.C. resident who died this year while living on the streets.

The reading was part of the third annual homeless memorial vigil put on by the People for Fairness Coalition. The D.C.-based coalition consists of advocates for the homeless, many of whom also spent time on the streets.

November 4, 2015
PHLUSH
People living in, working in, and visiting European and Asian capitals take it for granted that, when they need to go, they will find a clean, safe, and available public restroom nearby. Unfortunately, this is not the case in downtown Washington DC.
June 17, 2015
streetsense
People surround the entrance to Miriam's Kitchen on a hot and muggy Wednesday, June 17. The crowd's excitement is palpable. Today, People for Fairness Coalition turns seven.
April 29, 2015
Vimeo
Cinema From the Street is a city film series produced - from concept to content - by the the unhoused and formerly unhoused citizens of the nation's capital. This film is the third of three that premiered at our Co-op's first showcase of works April 29, 2015 at the Landmark at E Street in Washington, D.C.